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 William Stout

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Flaming Turd
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Flaming Turd

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PostSubject: William Stout   William Stout EmptyWed 30 Apr - 20:28

Sorry I don't post the images directly, i'm too tired:



William Stout was born in Salt Lake City, Utah and grew up in southern California's San Fernando Valley. He won a full California State Scholarship to the Chouinard Art Institute (California Institute of the Arts) where he obtained his BA. Stout began his art career as an illustrator, earning several Gold and Silver Medals from the Society of Illustrators as well as a recent Ben Franklin Award.

Themed entertainment design for Walt Disney, Universal, LucasFilm and DreamWorks earned Stout a reputation as the top conceptualist and designer in that field. He has worked as a designer on over 30 feature films. A 1989 polar journey led to a one-man exhibition of 45 oil paintings that toured the world for seven years and reflected his efforts to make Antarctica the first World Park. Stout is the National Science Foundation's 1992/93 Antarctic Artists and Writers Program Grant recipient.

He has had over 80 international museum exhibitions, including the British Museum, the Royal Ontario Museum, the Smithsonian, and the American Museum of Natural History, with permanent displays at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, Walt Disney's Animal Kingdom, and the Museum of the Rockies. Stout resides in Pasadena, California, with his perfect wife and their two brilliant sons.


Official:

http://www.williamstout.com/



Portfolio:

http://www.fineartpublishing.com/artists/stout/index.shtml



From "Pan's Labyrinth":

http://www.deltorofilms.com/featured_pix/stoutpan1.jpg


http://www.deltorofilms.com/featured_pix/stoutpan3.jpg


http://www.deltorofilms.com/featured_pix/stoutpan4.jpg


http://www.deltorofilms.com/featured_pix/stoutpan5.jpg



Interviews:

http://www.sdnhm.org/exhibits/mystery/makingof/stout.html


http://www.dinosaur.org/disneydinostout.htm



Prehistory murals:

http://www.sdnhm.org/media/images_stoutmurals.html



Artic Dinosaur:

http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2007/12/14/gallery/dinosaur-540x380.jpg


http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/images/2007/12/11/glacialosaurus2_2.jpg



Cryolophosaurus:

http://tea.armadaproject.org/sajor/cryostoutscan.jpg



Albertosaurus:

http://www.search4dinosaurs.com/albertosaur.gif



http://www.tfaoi.com/am/5am/5am306.jpg


http://www.hour25online.com/pix/dinos01a.jpg




William Stout's Godzilla concept

William Stout (Conan the Barbarian,The Return of the Living Dead,Pan's Labyrinth) was hired to be the films production designer and he was also to produce a full colour teaser poster to tantalize potential investors. Stout also storyboarded 90-95% of the project along with artist such as Doug Wilder, creator of Johnny Quest. Scenes in the film were to include Godzilla destroying the Golden Gate bridge along with destruction of cable cars, buildings, people etc.... In the end he ends up on Alcatraz and is killed by having a nuclear missile shot down his throat, I'm sure that won't have done the city much good either. He was still going to be a fire/radiation spewing creature.


http://bp3.blogger.com/_jv-vx0HDjF0/RiYOHJRX5kI/AAAAAAAAAgw/8xEM1NhaHhI/s1600-h/godzilla-tkom-4.jpg


http://bp2.blogger.com/_jv-vx0HDjF0/RiYOG5RX5jI/AAAAAAAAAgo/KmrHkHRakJY/s1600-h/godzilla-tkom-2.jpg


http://bp0.blogger.com/_jv-vx0HDjF0/RiYTiZRX5rI/AAAAAAAAAho/DRsvc9MmsMU/s1600-h/godzilla-tkom-1.jpg


http://bp0.blogger.com/_jv-vx0HDjF0/RiYTiZRX5qI/AAAAAAAAAhg/Lztkp5iZm9w/s1600-h/godzilla-tkom-3.jpg



Book art:

http://www.everypicture.com/show_artist.php?id=61&page=1&sc=1


http://www.gamebooks.org/gallery/time02.jpg


http://www.gamebooks.org/gallery/time03.jpg


http://www.gamebooks.org/gallery/time06.jpg


http://www.gamebooks.org/gallery/time07.jpg


http://www.gamebooks.org/gallery/time16.jpg


http://www.gamebooks.org/gallery/time12.jpg


http://www.gamebooks.org/gallery/time21.jpg


http://www.forestlawn.com/Images/EPM/Visions_web_newSite.jpg



Magazine covers:

http://learning2share.blogspot.com/2007/06/bomp-magazine-1978-william-stout-cover.html


http://faculty.cua.edu/johnsong/hitchcock/pages/gein/weird-trips-comic.jpg


http://www.cartuneland.com/Pages/Alien%20Pig%20Farm%203,000.html


http://www.imagecomics.com/gallery2/g2data_373ph4nt/albums/comics/2007-07/alienpigfarm04.jpg



Movie posters:

http://www.impawards.com/1977/wizards.html


http://www.impawards.com/1979/life_of_brian.html



Statues:

http://www.mamegyorai.co.jp/images/items/107894-w300.jpg


http://www.mamegyorai.co.jp/images/items/107895-w300.jpg


http://images.zimooya.com/images/881713rotld-statue.gif



Stout portraits:

http://www.wingedtiger.com/CAA/events_news/images/guitar/comicon21.jpg



Biography:

http://www.creaturefeatures.com/artists_pages/William_Stout.html


http://mrebks.blogspot.com/2007/09/william-stout-artist.html
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conan_collector
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 1 May - 9:32

Thorgrim Good work, thanks alot..... thumleft
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 1 May - 18:07

Still wish he wouldve released his graphic CONAN THE BARBARIAN novel, based on the storyboarding from the film. Or had his CONAN III script turned into a novel.
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 1 May - 18:10

Cromulus The Destroyer wrote:
Still wish he wouldve released his graphic CONAN THE BARBARIAN novel, based on the storyboarding from the film. Or had his CONAN III script turned into a novel.


Rexor I agree with you, completely
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyMon 12 May - 22:04

WILLIAM STOUT can also be seen in the documentary "FRAZETTA: PAINTING WITH FIRE".


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mm65Opc74Y


Btw Milius is also interviewed and talks about CTB. He claims to have made "the only real Frazetta style looking movie ever". Rolling Eyes
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyMon 12 May - 22:06

If you guys find some more Stout artwork not linked, please share. thumleft
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyMon 12 May - 22:54

Sadly he doesnt seem to have any of his CONAN related material left. study

His website is very bare bones and extremely weak in CONAN movie related material.
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 2:48

William Stout Mar23005uy9


William Stout Pawilliamstoutthenewdinra0


Crylophosaurus.

William Stout Crylophosaurus2wj5


Premiere Burroughs artist William Stout, with a large dynamic painting of John Carter and Tars Tarkas battling the plant men.

William Stout Subla1h4od8


Artist William Stout and sculptor Mike Parks joined forces to make this intricate resin plaque to commemorate WonderFest 2005. It's 8-3/4" tall by 6" wide, and cast in 1 piece of White Resin. It is available in either a Pewter or Bronze finish.

Dino Plaque

William Stout E13rm5

Morlock Plaque

William Stout Ag3ho3


Sculpture of William Stout's Godzilla concept. A leaner, more dinosaurian Godzilla, it lost out in the Godzilla-remake game, but is still a terrific piece!

William Stout Naglezillacd4


Two Deinonychus face off in a drawing by William Stout.

William Stout Dinosez4


"Evolution of a mouse" by William Stout and Jim Steinmeyer. Pen and Ink, watercolor. From The Art of Mickey Mouse compiled by Craig Yoe and Janet Morra-Yoe. ©1991 The Walt Disney Company

William Stout Figure21mp4
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 12:13

The T-Rex on Steroids concept looked better than that 1998 iguana thing or man in suit look.
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 16:54

Sure! Take a look at the storyboards for the movie, in my first post. Why would they later chose the iguana thing instead??

Quote :
In 1983, director Steve Miner proposed to make an American Godzilla film. Toho approved of the plan, since all they had to do was loan out the image and name of their creation, let somebody else make the film, and sit back and reap the enormous box-office and merchandising rewards.

Toho agreed to allow Miner to develop a conceptualization of his film and begin seeking backing from Hollywood studios. Miner started by hiring Fred Dekker to write a screenplay and William Stout to develop some concept sketches.

Stout based his Godzilla design on a prototype developed and constructed by paleontologist Steve Czerkas and even made a teaser poster for the film, depicting Godzilla spitting atomic death on the Golden Gate Bridge. Dave Stevens developed numerous storyboards based on the Godzilla designs.
The prototype by Steve Czerkas:

William Stout Godzilla3dmodelyn8

Czerkas is NOT a paleontologist, as the article said, has no biology or geology or paleotology studies, he JUST owns a museum in Blanding, Utah.

William Stout Czerkasdv5

Steve Czerkas also created the models for the stop motion dinosaurs in "Planet of Dinosaurs" (1978). A really bad movie -(but very Frazettian in concept!!!) with pretty decent FX, which would give an idea of how the Stout's GODZILLA 3D would have looked like:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xK2M9WwIJ7U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6-h6Of0ZRQ

William Stout U46721l29noqd8


study BTW, the guy was also responsible of an embarrasing paleontologic fraud Mr. Green :

Quote :
A dinosaur enthusiast and artist named Steve Czerkas bought an apparently forged fossil dino/bird for $80,000. National Geographic foolishly featured the fossil in an article, calling it the "archaeoraptor". It was later proven to be a hoax by Chinese paleontologist Xu Xing, resulting in great embarrassment for National Geographic.


Going back to STOUT's Godzilla:

Quote :
Set to be released in 1984, Godzilla, King Of The Monsters In 3-D was to feature a complete reworking of the Godzilla mythos, as well as returning the beast to an antagonistic to humankind slant. The film was not only intended to be shot in 3-D, but was to feature stop motion animation from designs created by noted dinosaur artist William Stout.

Like the Tri-Star film, Minor wanted to completely alter Godzilla’s appearance, making him resemble a Tyrannosaurus rex in appearance and body structure, the only commonality with the original version being that the monster would retain its trademark dorsal fins.

As typical American fare, the film was to feature bad science to explain Godzilla’s origin, as well as totally ripping off the plot from the often fondly remembered 1961 British dai kaiju film Gorgo. However, the monster’s nuclear theme was to be restored, at least, and topical Cold War tensions were to be dramatized in the film.


The 1998 film spawned an animated series which continued the storyline of the movie. Fans received the series as being better than the movie.

William Stout 043396142176hm6 William Stout Zilla159kg1

William Stout Zilla167qw8 William Stout Zillatoon5xh1


WILLIAM STOUT wrotte one episode:

Quote :
#132: WHERE IS THY STING?

Writer: William Stout
Director: Frank Squillace
Original FOX Air Date: 2/26/00

At Fort Armstrong, New Mexico, Colonel Charles Tarrington has been experimenting with genetic mutations as a weapon for the government. The “First Wave” program has resulted in Ts-eh-GO, a giant scorpion with poisonous claws and a tail that spits out acid, while the “Second Wave” has created an army of dog-sized scorpions. Sensing the new mutations, Godzilla heads to the desert with Major Hicks and H.E.A.T. in hot pursuit.

Tarrington wants no interference with his plans, so he arrests H.E.A.T. and accuses Hicks of being too soft on Godzilla. But the colonel must change his tune when Ts-eh-Go and the Second Wave scorpions go on a rampage, and Godzilla becomes the only hope of stopping the monsters. He admits his mistakes to Hicks, then immediately orders the “Third Wave” into production.

Note: Writer William Stout is the author and artist of the acclaimed book The New Dinosaurs. He has also provided production art and storyboards for the films CONAN THE BARBARIAN (1982), FIRST BLOOD (1982), CONAN THE DESTROYER (1984), RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD (1985), MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE (1987), and the unmade GODZILLA: KING OF THE MONSTERS IN 3-D.
Ts-eh-GO was named after the Navajo word for
“scorpion”.

William Stout 13qi9

The Nightmare Scorpion from Randy’s fever dream.

William Stout 32nightmare1df3
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 17:10

An article about the work of Richard Hescox and STOUT in the movie "House":

http://www.rogercobbshouse.com/housespecials.htm

William Stout Mpa002da9
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 18:46

An EXCELLENT gallery of dinosaurs:

http://www.umtoquedearte.com/silver/wstout5.htm


VERY INTERESTING interviews by John Arcudi:

http://www.tcj.com/ws03/stoutindex.html


An interview with Stout about a book by Richard MAtheson he illustrated:

http://www.scifi.com/sfw/issue257/interview.html


Quote :
Music... Bill plays rock guitar and occasionally sings or writes songs, and he sorta "made his bones" as a music industry artist producing scores of covers for the great Trademark of Quality rock music bootlegs of the early to mid Seventies (as in the Stones drawing), then creating many industry-legitimate covers for Varese Sarabande LPs and CDs. Plus he is a fanatical collector--of records, CDs, laserdiscs, DVDs, comic books, art books... Bill has amassed what may be the single best and biggest collection of 19th and 20th Century illustrated books in the world; hard to know of any measurable rivals, anyway!
Covers for THE WHO:

A 1974 bootleg of The Who's 1973 Philadelphia concert.

William Stout A1974bootlegofthewhos19xk8

An 1974 bootleg featuring B-sides and rarities.

William Stout An1974bootlegfeaturingbrm0


April of 1993 saw the release of the "William Stout's Lost Worlds", the first of three trading card sets by Comic Images (to date, over 20 million William Stout trading cards have been sold).

William Stout Williamstout1bxmk0 William Stout Williamstout2bxoz0



Stout helped to design "Edgar", the key alien in "Men In Black" in 1996. Original Maquette of Edgar Alien.

William Stout Edgarmibdt5 William Stout Originalmaquettefrommencp8

An early design by artist Mile Steves:

William Stout Edgarbug72bymilestevesva1



Clan of the Cave Bear - 1984. Presentation art, concept art, set design (uncredited).

William Stout Clanofthecavebear1986dvbw4


Stout made the storyboards for "First Blood". Couldn't find any piece but founded this art by RENATO CASARO. -(Some more poster art by Casaro here: http://www.impawards.com/designers/renato_casaro.html)-.

William Stout 2287nt2


Last edited by Flaming Turd on Sat 28 Jun - 17:00; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 18:49

"Return of the Living Dead"

William Stout Livingdead02bv4 William Stout Rotld002mn3 William Stout Livingdead04ct3 William Stout Rotld003zm8 William Stout Tarmanoz4


Up next is an interview with RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD production designer William Stout.

1- How did you get involved with "Return of the Living Dead"?

The short answer is that I got a call from the film's line producer, Graham Henderson. He asked me to come on board. There's more to it than that, though. I knew Dan through my friendship with Ron Cobb (Ron had worked with Dan on "Dark Star", "Star Wars", "Alien" and Alejandro Jodorowsky's "Dune"). I didn't know it, but Dan was considering me for the job back then. He really liked my drawings, especially my dinosaur art. But he wasn't sure that I could handle high tech design. Then at one of Ron's parties, I showed him an "Alien Worlds" comic book cover I had done, the one with the astronaut sinking into the ground, surrounded by nasty little beasties. Dan told me later he had an "Aha!" moment seeing that piece. Because of how I had designed the astronaut's suit, Dan knew I could handle the high tech elements in "Return of the Living Dead". I later found out that I was Dan O'Bannon's second choice, his first being Bernie Wrightson. Graham lied to Dan about calling Bernie (he never did call him) because Graham wanted someone on the film with more film experience (by that time I had already worked as a storyboard artist and designer on twelve features).

2- What was it like working with Dan O'Bannon? Would you work with him again? What do you think of him, both professionally and personally?

It was both easy and difficult working with Dan --- and for the same reason: he knows exactly what he wants and he's very demanding about it. He's an artist as well, and has a great visual sense. That made my job a lot easier because we spoke a lot of the same graphic language and shorthand. It was only difficult when we disagreed (which was rare). Then, I had to come up with a lot of damn good reasons to deviate from his expressed vision.

Professionally and personally, Dan is a very complex guy. I've seen him exhibit the biggest, kindest heart in the world. On the following day he could be cold and brusque. You have to understand that directing is an awesome undertaking. The director is averaging three hours of sleep per night --- everything is on his shoulders. When you're stretched that thin, it's understandable that a guy might get snappy and have occasional lapses in social graces.

Would I work with him again? In a New York second. He's one of film's best writers, and anything he chose to direct I can guarantee you would be special.

3- Did you feel any pressure at all since you were the youngest production designer in film history?

Absolutely! I tried to make up for my naivete and lack of experience with hard work. I averaged eighteen hour days, six days a week. On Sunday I'd put in an eight hour day. I was a fully hands on designer; I spent every day on the set; I watched all of the shooting. I even helped Tony Gardner operate the half corpse and split dog.

4- Did you have any input at all in the ROTLD film poster or any other promotional art for the film?

No, sadly. I really, really wanted to do the poster for the film. I even had an idea all sketched out. But the making of films and the advertising of films are two separate worlds that rarely meet. Ironically, though, I've worked in both of them. The producers of "Return of the Living Dead" apparently didn't realize that prior to my work in making films, I had worked on the ad campaigns of over 100 movies and had drawn loads of movie posters!

Dan O'Bannon did have me do the film's Ralph Steadman-style title treatment (the red spattered scratchy lettering) that turned up on the crew shirts and a lot of the film's promo items.

5- What materials from your work on the film do you still possess?

I still have all of my original designs except for two: I sold one of my original Tar-Man designs at Comic-Con International last year, and I gave away one of my ROTLD storyboards to a contest winner as part of some ROTLD promotion. But I've still got everything else, including a storyboard book, a cast-made blooper reel and a rough cut of the film before the effects were added. I've still even got a ROTLD promotional matchbook with my ROTLD logo!

6- Which cast members were the easiest to work with? Which were difficult?

James Karen is a dream to work with and a helluva actor; I'd recommend him for any film. He would even show up on his non-shooting days to cheer on and inspire the other cast members. One day he even brought Jason Robards to the set! Don Calfa, with all of his great, funny show biz stories was another favorite of mine. He took his work SO seriously. As a filmmaker I really appreciated that.

Difficult? Despite working in what I would describe as "combat conditions" there were very few complaints from the cast. Although young, they were very professional, all ready to pitch in when needed. Brian Peck just loves special effects; he would always help when we needed a spare hand. The difficult people were behind the camera --- not in front of it.

7- Of all the work you've done, how often are you asked about ROTLD?

It's one of my most popular movies. It seems to grow in cult status each year. I can't tell you how many times I've been greeted with "More brains!" When you consider that I did a lot of work on big budget box office champs like the "Conan" films, "First Blood" and even "Raiders of the Lost Ark", it's amusing as hell that the one film everyone seems to want to know about is our little low budget pic "Return of the Living Dead."

8- Can ROTLD fans send you things to autograph? If so, how would you like the process to be handled?

I'm the world's worst mail correspondent. Send me something and you may not see it for years. That's the truth. The best thing in that regard would be to have me do it in person during one of my convention appearances. I generally appear at at least four shows around the country during the year. I'm always at San Diego's big show, Comic-Con International, where I always have a booth. Check out my website (www.williamstout.com) from time to time under "Appearances" for other shows.

9- How proud are you of your work on ROTLD? Is there anything you would've liked to have done differently?

I'm extremely proud of my work on "Return of the Living Dead", especially considering how hard it was to make that film. It turned out fine, mostly due to the strength and persistence of Dan O'Bannon's vision and great script. Having said that, there's tons of stuff that I'd have done differently, the main thing being the corpse make-ups that were so poorly executed (not Kenny Myers' stuff --- he was great) due to having a friend of the producer foisted upon me for the beginning of the shoot. Ironically, that's an area where I have a lot of friends; I could have called in lots of favors and had astounding corpses all throughout the film. I'm sure that Rick Baker would have pitched in with something amazing. Just look at my board of corpse designs entitled "The Boys"; THAT is what should have been in the film and wasn't.

10- What was the general mood on the set? Did you find it a difficult or easy environment to work in?

"Return of The Living Dead" was one of the hardest films I ever worked on. It was a real trial by fire --- so difficult and grueling that I quit the film business for about nine months afterward. The mood on the set each day was often extremely tense. They don't know it, but I came THAT CLOSE to taking out a crew member or two on occasion. I'm very protective of my crew and won't stand for their abuse.

Most low budget pictures are really tough because nearly everyone working on them is not working in the job that they really want. So you've got a whole crew of dissatisfied people who think that they can do everyone else's job better. And with a first time director --- well, EVERYONE thinks that they could do a much better job, just given the chance. They're all full of it, of course --- especially in regards to Dan.

11- Are you happy that, after many years, ROTLD is *finally* being re-released on home video? Since DVD can offer us bonus material, are you hoping sketches, etc. would be included in a stills gallery?

I'm a big video bonus fan (going back to laser discs). so I'm really happy that ROTLD might get its proper treatment on DVD. I'm hoping that my art and comments will be included on the disc, but you never know about these things. "Masters of the Universe" just got re-released on DVD with director commentary. They never even bothered to contact me even though I've got tons of stories about the making of that film and four entire flat file drawers filled with hundreds of the original paintings and designs for that film!

12- What did you think of ROTLD the first time you watched the completed film?

Except for the some of the corpses which I wished had been better executed, I loved it. It's a smart, funny film that plays by the rules and delivers a solid hour and a half of entertainment. I've watched it over and over and still get a kick from it. It really holds up.

13- Do you enjoy hearing from ROTLD fans? Any funny/odd experiences you could share?

I LOVE meeting fans! I've met ROTLD fans who can quote entire scenes, word-for-word, from the film. I'm always amazed by what an effect that film has had on people. The funny part is that Dan chose Louisville, Kentucky as the film's setting. Louisville just happened to have some huge chemical fires around the same time, so we used that real footage at the end of the film. My wife's from Louisville, too. Odd.

14- What is your creative process like?

To design a film, I first meet with the director to get a feel for what he wants. Then I read the script. Then I read it again so that it all really sinks in. Then I read it a third time and make notes. I compile a list of all the sets that have to be designed, noting whether they're interior or exterior, day shoot or night shoot, all the special effects and all the special make-ups. Basically, I put together a thorough design job work list for myself. Then I start drawing, usually painting pictures of key scenes in the film, making sure that I am in synch with the director's vision. These paintings set the tone for the rest of the production, explaining visually what we're after. They serve to inspire the studio and investors as well. As we get closer to shooting, my pictures get faster and looser; time is my enemy. I begin hiring my crews, starting with a strong art director. As production designer I am responsible for everything you see on screen except for the performances of the actors. That means I am in charge of all the set design, costumes, makeup, vehicles, special effects make-up, props, set dressing and special effects. On "Masters of the Universe" I had over 1200 people working under me. I also often argue with the director of photography about the lighting. I'm a hands-on production designer, so if it's in the budget I'll see the film all the way through post-production. Designing a film is a ton of work.

15- How much freedom did you have on designing ROTLD? Did the film's budget restrict your ideas greatly or do you prefer challenges like that?

Within Dan's strong vision I had an enormous amount of freedom. Dan trusted me to come through on things. Several times, though, I was thwarted by the line producer who often had his own agenda that had little to do with the final quality of the film that I could discern. Yet, more often than not, the line producer came to my aid when needed. He was another complex guy I have yet to figure out.

I love challenges, especially ones like "We only have a dollar and fifty cents for this; can you make it look like it cost a thousand bucks?" Anybody can make a thousand bucks look like a thousand bucks; there's no trick to that.

16- Are your children old enough to watch ROTLD? If so, have they and what did they think?

I made the mistake of running a video of ROTLD at my Mom's house during a holiday visit. Everything was great until Tar-Man appeared. My four year old son shot straight up out of his chair, screaming, and ducked behind the chair. He wouldn't come out until we had popped the video out of the machine. I had forgotten about the potency of that scene and that great performance by Allan Trautman.

17- Have you seen the 2 sequels to "Return of the Living Dead"? If so, what did you think of them?

I have not seen either of them. I was offered the first sequel. I read the script and was shocked, angered and deeply offended that entire sections of Dan O'Bannon's original script had been plagiarized. I couldn't believe that these people could be so clueless.

What made "Return" special was that it was original in concept and design. That fact has been (and apparently still is) lost on the powers-that-be who mistakenly thought that people went to see the original "Return" because of the strength of the "Living Dead" title brand. That indeed may have gotten the first few bodies into the theaters, but after that it was the word-of-mouth about how funny, creepy and especially original Dan's film was that kept them coming back for more. That is exactly what has made the first film (and not the sequels) a cult classic; it's not merely because it had the good fortune of having "Living Dead" in the title.


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 19:17

Stout wrote "The Warrior and the Sorceress" (1984) for Roger Corman.

Actually a remake of "Yojimbo" (1961, Kurosawa), and starring BadMotherfuckingDavid Carradine, the story revolves around two warring factions fighting over control of the town's only well.

William Stout 44370800zs1mp7

William Stout Warriorandthesorceressei1

Photos are from the climactic fight between Kief (Anthony) and Kain (Carradine). Although Carradine is right-handed, he had to fight with his left. The black "glove" on his right hand is a cast--an accident during the filming broke his hand, forcing the change.

William Stout Wsow8

William Stout Ws1yx7

William Stout Ws4js5

William Stout Ws3kl3

William Stout Ws2nh3

Quote :
Actually, the first film I wrote that actually got made into a movie was for Roger Corman. It was called The Warrior and the Sorceress. It wasn't the original title -- there is no sorceress in the film!

Some reviews:

http://www.badmovies.org/movies/warsorceress/

http://www.dvdverdict.com/reviews/warriorsorceress.php

http://www.1000misspenthours.com/reviews/reviewsn-z/warriorandthesorceress.htm


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 19:35

John McTiernan's "PRINCESS OF MARS". (1990)


Stout painting for "A Princess of Mars":

William Stout Bbb16tm2zb0

During the 1980s, Disney optioned the rights of Burrough's JOHN CARTER OF MARS, with Mario Kassar and Andrew Vajna (Carolco) brought on as producers. John McTiernan, fresh off the sucess of Die Hard (1988), had been hired to direct a screenplay by Terry Rossio and Ted Elliott with William Stout hired as production designer.

Tom Cruise had been rumored to be in talks for the role of John Carter. However, the sheer scale of the project, coupled with what McTiernan saw the "limitations" of special effects at the time, kept the project from being fully realized.

The pre-production financing alone contributed to the eventual bankrupture of Carolco. After numerous attempt to reinvigorate the project in the 1990s, Disney finally pulled the plug and attempted to sell the rights to the film. After several years, they were finally acquired by Paramount. It is rumored Paramount optioned the rights to this series two years ago from the Burroughs estate for $300,000 against $2 million.


READ THE STORY HERE:
Quote :
http://www.tcj.com/ws03/stoutmars.html


William Stout's "Gods of Mars":

William Stout Stout1h4cb7


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 19:43

Theodore Rex -(1995).

Stout was the Production Designer.

Quote :
Oh yeah. Theodore Rex: The most nightmarish experience of my entire film career... It's totally unwatchable.
William Stout 826758theodorerexposteraq7

Theodore Rex was a movie starring Whoopi Goldberg. The film is set in a world where humans and human-sized, genetically-engineered dinosaurs co-exist. Goldberg stars as a human police detective assigned to investigate a "dinocide" (the murder of a dinosaur) and is forced to enlist the aid of Theodore, a civilian Tyrannosaurus rex and possible eye-witness.

Goldberg attempted to withdraw from the project but was ultimately forced to participate after legal action against her was initiated. William Stout said that the main role was originally wrote for VAL KILMER... Laughing


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 19:46

The 8th Voyage of Sinbad - Return to Colossa - 1994

Quote :
I've written a sequel to Seventh Voyage of Sinbad using creatures that Ray Harryhausen has always wanted to have in films but for some reason or another never had the chance to do.

List of Ray Harryhausen's CREATURES:

http://theseventhvoyage.com/creatures.htm

Quote :
In the vein of ABU, I've got a series of paintings on my Things To Do list that will depict various scenes from a sequel to "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad" that I co-wrote with Ray Harryhausen. We'll use those paintings to try to sell the film.

(Stout's interview dated 2002)


PREQUEL of the Will Stout's movie: Harryhausen's "7th voyage of Sinbad"-

http://theseventhvoyage.com/theseventhvoyagefilm.htm


William Stout Big7thvoyagesinbad2mx7 William Stout 7th20voyage20sinbad20jaya4

William Stout 233a3dz5

William Stout Kerwinwebzy5

William Stout Skeleton2qj9

William Stout Concept1po3

William Stout Concept6iz7

William Stout Concept3pq0



Actually a movie called "8th VOYAGE OF SINBAD" is in project but nothing from the Stout script appears to have been taken.

Quote :
Keanu Reeves is set to board The 8th Voyage of Sinbad at Columbia Pictures for director Rob Cohen and producer Neal Moritz, reports Variety.

Reeves will star as Sinbad the sailor, the legendary character from "The Arabian Nights." In the film, set in eighth-century China, Sinbad and his shipmates embark on a quest to find the Lamp of Aladdin. Along the way, they meet a beautiful empress and battle fantastical creatures as well as a rebellious Chinese general who threatens the kingdom with his supernatural powers.

Charlie Mitchell is rewriting a script by Cormac and Marianne Wibberly and Tedi Sarafian.

Special-effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen took up Sinbad's story several times before at Sony with The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad (1958), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1974) and Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977).


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 20:08

WILLIAM STOUT SCRIPTS FOR CONAN MOVIES

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Conan and the Eye of Death - (1983)

Quote :
I wrote a Conan screenplay as well, Conan and the Eye of Death, adapted from a lot of the Robert E. Howard stories.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

KING CONAN - (2003)

Quote :
I had just begun to write King Conan, a screenplay about Conan as an old king, when I discovered that John Milius was writing the very same thing; it's very King Lear. So I dropped that one.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 21:30

Leviathan - 1987

Creature designs (uncredited)

William Stout 14027007jl9 William Stout Leviathanop7

Interesting, as some time ago we found a resemblance between the creature and the Ron Cobb's "sea dragons" from the atlantean weapon!

William Stout Atlanteanckm1



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predator - 1985

Creature designs (uncredited)

William Stout 03924990predatorposterssb5


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Dino Riders - 1988

Marvel Animation Studios - (tv cartoon)

Dino-Riders is a cartoon television series that aired in the late 1980s, primarily as a promotion to launch a new Tyco toy line. Only fourteen episodes were produced, thirteen of which were aired as part of the Marvel Action Universe. Episodes were also released as a collection of Dino-Riders VHS tapes, which are sometimes sought after as collectors' items.

William Stout as dinosaur re-designer and accuracy consultant

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5upOTlJ_bg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVYF_B037zI&feature=related

William Stout Dino2jx6


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The land before time

Apparently inspired by the art of William Stout.

Quote :
In 1981, his book "The Dinosaurs - A Fantastic New View of a Lost Era" was published. This book was followed by Ray Bradbury's "Dinosaur Tales" and "The Little Blue Brontosaurus" (recipient of the 1984 Children's Choice Award and the basis for Lucas and Spielberg's "The Land Before Time".

William Stout Sharptoothkv1

William Stout Littlefoot27shatchedyr5

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The natural history project

http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/The_Natural_History_Project


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 22:22

Very interesting ongoing thread... study

Just a quick note: actually, this artwork...

William Stout Stoutmarsfn3

...is not from the Princess of Mars project, as explained at the top of the article: "artwork for the project under discussion was unavailable, and therefore this piece from Stout's work for Buck Rogers was instead used for illustration." Wink

Oh, and the Predator he designed had nothing to do with the Stan Winston Studios/Steve Wang version we all know and love.

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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptyThu 5 Jun - 22:33

Flaming Turd wrote:
Actually a movie called "8th VOYAGE OF SINBAD" is in project but nothing from the Stout script appears to have been taken.

Keanu Reeves + Rob Cohen doing a Sinbad movie? Thanks God, Sony pulled the plug on that alternate project (which was originally developped by John Singleton back in 2001...)!

(Though I suspect Cohen actually recycled some of his Sinbad ideas into The Mummy 3)

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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptySat 7 Jun - 5:24

study Actually I don't know what designs Stout could have made for the Predator... I know the one of the first ones was this. Do you know if it came from Stout?

Quote :
Designed by Boss Film FX.

William Stout Predator2xr7 William Stout Predatororiginaldesignfz2

William Stout Predator1mg7


Then I founded these next early Predator concept designs, hoping some of them would be related to Stout's desing?

William Stout 1056860753781d10d3f1se1

William Stout 1056852355420b64ce60vq3 William Stout 1057705940575f5f02eayt1


Preliminary designs by Stan Winston:

William Stout Dibujoyr5


William Stout 81047232ry9 William Stout 85148699se9


Finally I founded these interesting pieces:

Quote :
Q- Didn't William Stout work on some preliminary creature designs?

A- I know Bill Stout fairly well. We used to be good mates. I like his cartoons. But I never saw any of his work on or in PREDATOR at all! Remember, I came in on what was pretty much a brand new film. I didn't find out who worked on the film before me till I was well into 3 weeks working on it! I was not allowed to see their work and, yes, I did try... Anyway, I'm sure there were lots of creature design concepts for the Hunter/Predator, only I never saw them.

Quote :
At Wonderfest 2002 in Louisville, Kentucky, I went to one of William Stout's talks. Anyways, he said he worked on predator (actually he's the one who designed the mask) and he said that the original script had a TINY alien inside the predator costume (like in independence day). Stout, at the time, thought this was a brilliant moral idea (that Arnold beats up this helpless thing) and showed it to the director. Stout congratulated the director on an excellent script. However, the director threw the script back at him and said "Whoah, that's gotta go. We can't have Arnold beating up a wimp!!" (The director hadn't seen the whole script) I think that's really great! (Source: a speech)

So, apparently Stout was responsible of THIS?:

William Stout 444ro1 William Stout Rerjc7


Btw, RON COBB also made some concept designs.

study


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptySat 7 Jun - 5:36

GALAXY OF TERROR - (1981)

William Stout was co-writter.

William Stout Galaxyofterrorposter021da2

Very bad movie, I watched it a couple of years ago as I had the very stupid and useless hobby of watching alien rip-offs. This one is one of the few I watched till the end, not beacuse it was good -man, it did suck!- but because you could not imagine what the fuck would happen next.

Besides that the film had relly good designs and atmospheric touches. The alien pyramid in fact was designed by James Cameron! before he made alien2.

William Stout Galaxy05ld2

William Stout Aosmamoviesgalaxyofterrwf7

William Stout Galaxyofterror3tk5

Surely William Stout as writter and James Cameron as designer were heavily "inspired" by these unused concept art by the original "ALIEN" (Ridley Scott).

Chris Foss:

William Stout A1art26eu2

Giger:

William Stout A1art1sa4

Our beloved RON COBB:

William Stout A1art17fm7


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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptySat 7 Jun - 11:43

Flaming Turd wrote:
Finally I founded these interesting pieces:

Quote :
Q- Didn't William Stout work on some preliminary creature designs?

A- I know Bill Stout fairly well. We used to be good mates. I like his cartoons. But I never saw any of his work on or in PREDATOR at all! Remember, I came in on what was pretty much a brand new film. I didn't find out who worked on the film before me till I was well into 3 weeks working on it! I was not allowed to see their work and, yes, I did try... Anyway, I'm sure there were lots of creature design concepts for the Hunter/Predator, only I never saw them.

Hey, as a matter of fact, *I* was the one who conducted that Paul Power interview! Cool (...without even knowing at the time that he was a former porn-star!!!) Shocked Laughing

There: http://www.conancompletist.com/eatersofthedead/interviews/power.htm

The only tiny glimpse of Stout's work on Predator that I ever saw was on that magazine (cover?) illustration he did for the Winter 2003 issue of The Comics Journal:

William Stout Tcjsm1

Look, right there, in the upper right hand corner, between "Arnold as Conan" (with the helmet on) and the "Frazetta Conan", right under the Moebius' Arzach character flying on his birdlike reptile, that's Stout's version of the Predator!

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PostSubject: Re: William Stout   William Stout EmptySat 7 Jun - 16:35

MightyMcT wrote:
Hey, as a matter of fact, *I* was the one who conducted that Paul Power interview! Cool (...without even knowing at the time that he was a former porn-star!!!) Shocked Laughing

Shocked Razz rabbit voui! Good work!!! thumleft
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