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 The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular

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Flaming Turd
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PostSubject: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 2:59

Universal Studios Hollywood is a movie studio in Universal City, California, and is the original Universal Studios theme park.

In 1983 the live show "The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular" opens (created with Landmark Entertainment) in the Castle Theatre, based on the film "Conan the Barbarian".





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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:07



Castle Theatre, June 18th 1983 - 1994(?)

Quote :
Enter the world of swords and sorcery, a magical time of wizards and warriors where fantasy and reality meld into an awe-inspiring spectacle of clanging steel and powerful spells. Conan has only his strength and sword to defend himself against evil forces more powerful than any man.

"The Adventures of Conan" is one of the most advanced synthesis of special effects, pyrotechnics, laser technology and live action ever combined into one thrilling presentation. Feel the heat as Conan battles the deadliest fire-breathing dragon ever.

From "Universal Studios Hollywood Guide", 1991

An MCA Recreation Services production
Jay Stein, President
Barry Upson, VP Planning
Produced by: Peter Alexander




Conan is revealed (From Universal Studios Hollywood Guide, 1991)



The Adventures of Conan(From Universal Studios Hollywood Guide, 1991)



The Adventures of Conan(From Universal Studios Hollywood Guide, 1991)




The one relic from the Conan show that still remains on public view in the park - the sword held by the endoskeleton at the exit of T2:3D. (June 2006)

Created by Landmark Entertainment (http://www.landmarkusa.com) and inspired by the 1982 film Conan the Barbarian. Work began on the attraction in 1982 at Landmark, and the show opened to great acclaim on June 18th 1983 with a total budget of $5 million.


CAST:

In 1983, the characters featured in the show were:

Conan the Barbarian
Red Sonja
Wizard Kallias
Taras Mordor (evil sorceror)
Azura (axe-wielder)
Double Swordsman
Balash-Cushite
Young Conan


Quote :
PRESS RELEASE - 1983:

Universal Studios Tour, an excursion behind-the-scenes through Hollywood's biggest and busiest movie and television studio, is celebrating it's 20th birthday this July. The Tour, which started modestly by giving tram tours daily to less than 200 people, is today California's third-most popular attraction.

In 1983, more than 3.5 million guests are anticipated to visit the 420-acre entertainment complex, which produces more prime-time television series and movies and more feature films that any other studio in the world.

To help celebrate the Tour's 20th year in operation, Universal creative and special effects experts are devising the Tour's most complex and rousing attraction to date, "The Adventures of Conan", a sword and sorcery spectacular.

Insprired by the popular 1982 Universal Pictures release Conan the Barbarian, the new Tour show will be a $3.75 million production featuring state of the art, never before seen laser and pyrotechnic special effects, combined with the skills and computer-coordinated animated characters.

The "Adventures of Conan" production team led by tour vice- president Peter Alexander and a staff of top Hollywood special effects and dramatic consultants, recently announced that the show will debut June 18. They are currently perfecting and safety testing the myriad of delicate special effects, including an 18-foot tall, fire-breathing dragon that shoots twin lasers from its eyes.

The dragon, controlled by a series of sensitive computers, appears during the climax of the show. According to Alexander, the special effects contained in the dragon - when combined with the show's magical illusions, other lasers, live actors and animated characters - is a first in live theatre, anywhere.

"The Adventures of Conan" is located in the heart of the Tour's Visitors Entertainment Center, site of three other live shows, two museums, exhibits, shops, food and refreshment stands and leisure-picnic areas.
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:10

Supposedly i think Jody Samson did those bad swords. Was a good program from what I heard, production value was nice and had a good Basil score, some of which he carried over to CTD.
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:12







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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:14




From "On Location", August 1983

Quote :
Universal's 'Adventures of Conan' Bewitches Audiences With EFX & Live Action

By Beth Anderson


Setting: Hell.
A leaden incubus hands in the fetid fog of the underworld. With hearts pounding, the hero and his female companion glance apprehensively around.
Sillness.
Movement.
A rasping hiss, a deafening roar, the earth thunders as the leviathan head of a great serpent explodes from the deep. The startled victims whirl to face the sound as the titanic reptile spits bolts of fire at its prey. Spears of lightning slice through the fiery chamber as the hero and his companion battle the great serpent. Suddenly the viper screams and recedes into the earth.

Not since the days of Disney's dinosaur dioramas has there been such a bewitching exhibition of audio-animatronics as seen in the new live theater sword and sorcery spectacular, the "Adventures of Conan", currently showing at Universal Studios Tour. This live presentation, inspired by the 1982 adventure film "Conan the Barbarian", features highly complex, cinema-quality, state-of-the-art special effects that break new ground in live entertainment.

The central motif focuses on the adventures encountered by the hero, "Conan the Barbarian," and the heroine, "Red Sonja," as they attempt to free themselves from imprisonment within the palace of evil sorcerer Taras Mordor. The special effects were archetypal in that live actors performed within an environment of lasers, pyrotechnics and animatronics, effects which require carefully monitored safeguards.

An intricate network of computers monitors the various technical elements of the show (live actors, lasers, pyrotechnics, animatronics, effects). The master computer is the INTEL computer, an analog computer which allows functions to happen via signals it sends to the remaining computers. They interface with the INTEL and do all their own logic and analog controls, which interface and allow the lasers and certain canned sound effects to happen. The subordinate computers include the Allen Bradley computer, the T1520 (lasers), the serpent computer and the lighting computer.

The Allen Bradley controls the actors' interface with all the technical devices and allows the actors to move within specific areas safely. It controls all of the pyrotechnics and safety devices as well as doing the actual logic. Show project manager, Larry Lester, explained the application of the Allen Bradley.

"The Allen Bradley serves as the nucleus for all of the digital information that comprises the sensors for all the safety devices. It says, 'if this is true, this is true and this is true, then we can do this.' Essentially, it's the safety device. It says, 'the actor's in place; he's stepping on a safety mat; the SMPTE Time Code is in the correct position; a window is available in the SMPTE code; the laser is enabled; the actor is breaking an infrared beam,' and then there's a laser hit. When that laser is fired, you get another signal to the Allen Bradley, adn that 'allows a chip' that has a specific repeatable sound in it to go through its sequence.

"With each specific laser effect, where there is the potential danger of the actor getting involved in an area where the laser might be, there are pressure sensitive mats in the floor that require an actor to have a foot on each mat. The minute he lifts a foot, the laser is disenabled. If he is not on that mat, then he's someplace else on stage, and one of those places that he could be is in the way of the laser.

"Overriding all of this are the laser safety officer and the technical director whose hands are constantly on a button which is flashing, indicating to him by that flash that that specific window is now open. If there's any danger that he sees on stage, if he were to lift his finger at any time, the laser will be disenabled. It involves a human making a judgement in addition to what the computer is doing.

"Essentially everything starts from the SMPTE code, which is the real time that's set to the music track. There are variables within that which are time windows, during which an effect can happen, which helps us take advantage of little idiosyncrasies in the actual blocking. If they're a few seconds late on a specific effect - some of the windows are only five seconds long; some are 15 to 20 seconds long - a specific laser cannot happen except within that 20-second window. It doesn't fire the laser, it just says that the laser can only happen during this time window," said Lester.

In conjunction with these time windows are the sound effects, which must also be co-ordinated with real tiem. Sound Chamber's (North Hollywood) Jerry Laidman, who designed the sound system for the show, outlined his involvement with the effects, "We developed a digital bubble memory storage of audio effects enabling us to co-ordinate audio effects with real time activities. The laser will have a window of activity, adn since the laser is going to fire sometime within that window, we've got to have the sound happen exactly when the laser happens. So we developed a method of storage of audio which can be instantaneously replayed through a digital bubble, therefore when the laser fires, we fire an audio effect that happens instantaneously.

"In the effect where Red Sonja moves her sword to block the laser beam, that takes place by her moving the sword through a photocell, which means yes, the sword is in the right position, which activates the laser, which then fires at the sword, and the sound effect fires simultaneously with the laser.

"The sound is handled in several different areas. The sound for the majority of the program is handled through a digital storage system. We chose digital because it doesn't deteriorate over a long period of time. The there are the special timed effects which are stored on digital, but they're on hard memory digital, not tape digital. By having them on hard memory, they can be easily accessed. I sent the effects through the different sound systems - the 'four-point source system' - meaning that when an actor is left stage, the sound comes from left stage. Or when he's right stage, it comes from right stage. When the serpent comes up, the sound of the serpent comes from the serpent area rather than from the main house speakers," said Laidman.

Properly orientated sound was not the only obstacle to overcome in the process of bringing the serpent to life. According to its designer, Tom Reidenbach of Animated Show Productions, Los Angeles, "It's the largest piece of audio-animatronics with that many complicated programmed moves. Earlier in the '50s, Disney did some big dinosaurs in a diorama, but they simply moved their heads and mouths a little bit. The serpent is absolutely and completely programmed into the show to work with live actors. It was out of a whole new realm of animation although the technology was really there already. We had it developed; we just had never done anything quite that large before, nothing that's had to run constantly on a 12 to 14 hour-per-day schedule, 365 days a year.

"It's one thing to build a special effect for one take and get through the shot, but it's a whole other ball game when you start building a serpent that has to come on cue every single time. So it did present some problems that heretofore we had not experienced.

"My partner (Dave Schweninger) and I did all the animation and programming - we don't just physically build these things - we also do the movement. We actually choreographed the movement within the show itself. We put that on our computer; then it, in turn, is transferred into the main show computer system once we have our system - our movements - choreographed to the score and to the actors. Until we get it looking good, we do one movement at a time. For example, we may do entire segments where we just do the head turn. We have 'head nod,' which is up and down; 'head turn,' which is side to side; then we put in 'head tilt,' which is like a rolling motion.

"We program each one of its movements individually. We run the program through and program the mouth, then lay in on top of that the head turn, then the head nod - you do that with each and every one of the movements throughout the serpent. To get it to rise up, we used an elevator system for which we built a platform. The platform is a series of chain drive gears which are actually driven by an electric motor in a big shaft that pulls the entire platform up, which we call the animation base. That physically is about 24 feet down under the stage. We've developed a system of pivoting his body so that it looks like he's a lot deeper than he actually is when he comes out of that hole. We put it from a point where it appears to be that he's about 20 to 30 feet below where he actually is.

"The skin is a vinyl with a foam backing - developing one with vinyl skin that can actually move within an animation base is something else altogether," continued Reidenbach. "Of course, it had to be realistic. The main head components are fiberglass: then we have a variety of plastics that are used in some of the membranes. The horns themselves are foam with fiberglass over them. The eyes are - it's an old neon trick - it's really two neon coils in there. One is red; one is green, causing them to change colors when he shoots the lasers. The main frame itself is a combination of fiberglass structural members, steel and aluminium." And what happens when the serpent breathes fire? "Actually," clarified Reidenbach, "the flame doesn't occur until well outside the mouth, so we have very little heat buildup in there during the show."

The serpent posed problems of a different nature for laser specialist Dr. Sandor Holly of InterScience Technology. "The only feasible way to produce the effect of the laser beams seeming to emanate from the serpent's eyes was to have the beams originate from under the floor," explained Holly. "We send the beams up to the serpent's eyes through windows in the floor. The problem, of course, is that the serpent cannot be positioned very accurately, and if you don't accurately orient the serpent, the beams would run past the serpents head up into the ceiling.


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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:20

Music / Soundtrack

Basil Poledouris, who also scored the movie CONAN THE BARBARIAN was hired by Universal and Landmark to provide a score to run throughout the live-action show. The recording used in the show was performed by the London Philharmonic.

The (now) rare full soundtrack CD (consisting of the music, and the full soundtrack of the live show) can be obtained on the Super Tracks label.
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:21

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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:26

REVIEW of the soundtrack:

Quote :
Following on the heels of Conan The Barbarian's success in movie theaters, Universal Studios decided to take out their old House of Dracula stage show and replace it with the Sword and Sorcery Spectacular. The show followed the further adventures of everyone's favorite barbarian in his quest to find a unique stone, the Dragon's Eye, before the evil wizard does. To score the show, Universal wisely turned to the man who provided the thundering music to the movie, Basil Poledouris. For the show, Poledouris created close to 20 minutes of wall-to-wall music using his original score as a jumping off point.

The score begins with allusions to the familiar strains of "Anvil of Crom" and segues into the show's main theme, which is completely different than what is in the movie. What follows is something akin to the structure of a very short opera. It quickly builds momentum as it sets up the characters and the situation, followed by fast paced action music, grand choirs, and a rousing finale. While the score is heavy on the action cues, Poledouris isn't afraid to slow the pace down with quiet bits filled with dissonant strings. The chorus' ever-rising voices are used to evoke the power of evil and its fleeting triumph over good. Overall, the music has a no-holds-barred feeling of high adventure.

The first thing you notice when listening to this score is that it's low on the cheese factor, especially considering what others of its ilk sound like. Poledouris has created a companion piece to his film score without relying on simple rehashes of familiar themes. It's a well-crafted score that stands on its own. There are parts that sound distinctly Conan-esque and others that sound a bit like Williams' score to Raiders of the Lost Ark. That said, the music isn't as a grand as you might expect it to be. This is a Conan score by Poledouris and one expects it to be great, yet it somehow misses the power and beauty of the film's original score.

The sound quality on this promotional CD is quite good considering it's dated source (1983). The London Studio Symphony Orchestra gives the piece a nice full sound, but the choir sometimes falls short and never reaches the driving operatic heights of the film score. There are two tracks on the promotional CD released by SuperTracks. The first is an abridged version of the score with some of the show's dialogue, which is definitely cheesy. The second track is the heart of the disc: the complete score to the show without any dialogue. For Poledouris and Conan fans, it's definitely worth getting.

by Messrob Torikian

The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular - (Promotional Release)

Year Released: 2000

Composed and coducted by: Basil Poledouris

Performed by: The London Studio Symphony Orchestra and Voices

Orchestrated by: Greig McRitchie

Produced by: Ford A. Thaxton, Gary Goddard

Availability: Limited release of 3000 copies, available only through soundtrack specialty outlets.

Estimated Value: ($14.99)



Track Listings:

• 1. The Adventures of Conan (8:03)
• 2. Sword and Sorcery Spectacular (16:32)

Total Time: 24:36

Quote :
The Adventures of Conan: A Sword and Sorcery Spectacular: (Basil Poledouris) In the early 1980s, Americans were consumed by the need for adventures from the mythical age of sword and sorcery. With films such as Dragonslayer, Excalibur, and Beastmaster came audiences' desire to see even more of such fantasy epics. The most successful film of the genre is, of course, Conan the Barbarian, and not only did the film inspire a full-length motion picture sequel (the substandard Conan the Destroyer), but it also led to the creation of a live-action Conan stage show located at Universal Studios in 1983. The show, formally titled The Adventures of Conan: A Sword and Sorcery Spectacular, ran for ten successful years before being replaced by newer, more technically sophisticated attractions such as Jurassic Park: The Ride. The Conan show was scored in between the two feature films starring Schwarzenegger, and it was therefore logical to ask Conan master Basil Poledouris to score the show as well.

The show isn't all that long, lasting for about 20 minutes, but its intense Hyborean Age action required almost constant underscore of sufficient volume to give the audience a consistent rush of Conan fever. Poledouris tackled the assignment with the same seriousness as for the original film, employing orchestrator Greig McRitchie and the large London Studio Symphony Orchestra and Voices to duplicate the pounding depth of the music from Conan the Barbarian. The resulting quarter of an hour of music by Poledouris remained a difficult item to obtain on CD for quite a while. The suite which comprises the second track on this album had appeared on a few Poledouris compilation bootlegs, some of which selling for hundreds of dollars at online auction houses. This new, limited album from Super Tracks, a soundtrack specialty label, is devoted to only the Conan show and includes two tracks, the music alone and with the original dialogue from the live action on stage.

The music itself is a viable extension of Conan the Barbarian. While neither the title nor love themes from the motion picture score are directly translated into the show, bits and pieces do appear in mutations throughout. For instance, a bar of the title theme from Conan the Barbarian is inserted at (6:50) and the finale in the second track, as the pulsating rhythm of Crom occurs at (8:30) in the same track. Avid fans of Poledouris and the Conan series will recognize many of the composer's woodwind and brass styles continuing from the film as well. A strong timpani and a few new thematic twists keep the live-action score distinct enough to enjoy apart from Conan the Barbarian (unlike the Back to the Future: The Ride score, for which Silvestri just took his original film themes and pieced them together into a suite for the ride). Poledouris' score is heavy with choir and brass in a dramatic effort, with only the shrill scoring for the slaying of the dragon at the end providing a weakness in its musical content.

Taken from analogue originals for digital mastering onto this CD, there is a noticable tinniness to the sound of the music in general, but that's to be expected from a 1983 recording. The first track features select portions of the dialogue and music together, while the second track includes only the expanded score of 16+ minutes by itself. The digital transfer has caused a few notes of interest for those of you running your audio out on Dolby surround systems. On a regular stereo, the CD sounds much more uniform, but audio fanatics such as myself will notice that the music is of slightly poorer quality on the track with the dialogue (it has a small treble hiss). Making this artifact more noticable is the booming, digitally superior quality of the dialogue. On the whole, however, the album is a grand addition to the collection of a devoted film music fan... It is like traveling back in time to the early 80s and living in the the great age of Conan mania all over again, with a fresh Poledouris score! Personally, I love the dialogue version, with a rumbling and majestic narrator who will be certain to awaken your neighbors at any hour of the day or night. The man portraying Conan needs to work on his Austrian accent, though...

By filmtracks.com


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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:28

Quote :
Reviewed by: Mikael Carlsson

Given the big hit Conan the Barbarian was in 1982, it was sort of natural to have Basil Poledouris onboard for the live-action stage show Universal decided to produce one year later. Perhaps its more surprising that this music shows up as a commercial CD release 17 years later, a limited edition (3 000 copies) from Super Tracks. Now, of course this is a real gem for Poledouris fans and it's really interesting to hear the Conan stylistics in what reminds me more of an orchestral rhapsody or perhaps a ballet score rather than a film score. Well, the cinematic style is there of course, but in terms of form and structure the 'Sword and Sorcery Spectacular' suite has a lot of appeal as an orchestral work on its own.

This album is only 24 minutes long, containing two cues: the first, 'The Adventures of Conan', is the story told with music in the background - something for the kids, probably, but not for me. Thankfully, we get to hear the music in extended form in the 16-minute suite 'Sword and Sorcery Spectacular'. This makes no use of the original Conan theme, but the rhythmic figures of the 'Main Title' from Conan the Barbarian is quoted in a Stravinsky-esque action sequence of the suite. There is also some writing for solo oboe which is reminiscent of the love theme in the film. Epic and swashbuckling, written for orchestra and choir, this work will satisfy any fan of the Conan film scores and maybe even Miklós Rózsa.
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:29

Quote :
Scoreland, October 8, 2000

This is a very odd CD, put out by you-know-who, which is the score Poledouris composed to a stage show that was played in Universal Studios CA back in the early 80s. Now, I'll be the first to admit, the idea of getting MORE Conan music from back with Poledouris was still doing that sort of thing is enough to send most score fanboys into spontaneous ecstatic emmission. The problem is that the CD is much like the proverbial "first time" - short, unsatisfying, and when it's over, you realize your life just hasn't changed that much.

The entire stage show was only about 20 minutes, 17 of which is scored. To pad out the CD, the first track is an expurgated version of the show WITH DIALOGUE, chopped down to eight intolerable minutes. Not only is the music almost entirely obscured by the voices, but the acting is straight out of bad Saturday Morning cartoons. If they were emoting any more, their skins would drop off. Oh wait, that's moulting. Nevermind. At any rate, I've seen Mexican Soap Operas with character acting that seems subtle by comparison. (I live in Texas, ya know. Half the stations on the air are broadcasts picked up from towers in Mexico that could probably broadcast to China)

In fact, I was utterly astounded when I first popped the CD in. The track just kept going on and on, I couldn't hear the music, and I was getting a headache from the booming voices. "Surely this can't be IT!" I shouted to myself. Luckily, it wasn't.

Track 2 is the entire score, sans comic book scripting. And the music is EXTREMELY good. This is Poledouris doing what he does best, with a full orchestra and choir merrily bounding along to epic heights. (although the girls singing out "Cooo-NAAAN!" is a bit cheesy) All of the music is directly descended from his work on the movies, although it doesn't actually contain any motifs from the two films that I could recognize. (the slower theme sounds directly related to the "wifeing" theme from Barbarian, though) I suppose an all new bombastic performance of Thulsa Doom's theme would be a bit too much to hope for.

Otherwise, it's 20 minutes of Cimmerianey goodness. (like that cereal that looks like toast) There are several motifs played with throughout, the performance is excellent, and IT'S FUCKING CONAN MUSIC!!!!!!!! It's like he took all the best bits of Conan the Barbarian and rolled them into 20 minutes. Anyone who likes the original score (which is to say, 99.9% of the score population) will eat this up.

This is a limited edition of only 3,000 copies, so if you want one, you'd better snatch it up really soon. I just have a hard time truly recommending this because, as truly great as the music is, the fact is you're paying about a dollar for every minute of usable music. (I'm not counting the horrible first track) Only serious Conan fanatics (or those who have fond childhood memories of the stage show) need apply, but then, that's probably why it's a limited edition.

Quote :
Soundtrack Express, October 16, 2000

After the success of the first two Conan films it was perhaps inevitable that there would be some kind of theme park spin off attraction with plenty of scope for sword fights and dramatic staging. Film composers are frequently asked to write music for theme park rides, perhaps Bruce Broughton having contributed the most scores for rides and shows, but in this case they decided to return to the composer who penned the music for the film, Basil Poledouris.

The first track is a condensed version of the music with narration and voice overs which are horrendously cheesy. Poledouris' music is gutsy and dramatic, but the melodramatic vocals do little but act as an embaressing way to drown out some good music. It also as quite a lot of hiss and is easily missable. Fortunately the second, lengthier track is devoid of dialogue and contains the full selection of music from the "Spectacular." I'm uncertain as to whether Poledouris deliberately avoided directly quoting the original Conan themes, but for one reason or another, the melodic material from the films is only alluded to and not fully quoted.

While it's nice to have things that start with a bang, Poledouris starts with a low key horn fanfare, but builds the music up to a section midway through that recalls the Anvil of Crom. Again, aside from similar rhythmic percussion and accompaniment, Poledouris doesn't actually go so far as quoting the horn fanfare from that particular cue. In fact it tends to sound more like the oft-quoted title music to Goldsmith's Capricorn One.

I'm sure that die hard Poledouris and Conan fans will enjoy this album immensely, but to be fair anyone else who has the original Conan scores will probably find little else of interest here. The fact that Poledouris doesn't use the themes leaves the lingering impression of it sounding like a poor imitation of the original scores. However his consummate skill as a composer does allow for it to be enjoyable enough. Having said that, the short running time and the inclusion of the dreadful Adventures of Conan (the track with narration) means it's tough to recommend.
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 3:30

Quote :
Soundtrack Review Central, December 24, 2000

Like most other self-respecting soundtrack fans, I love Basil Poledouris' score to the original Conan the Barbarian. I mean, what is there not to love about the terrific themes and stunning chorus work? So it was with anticipation that I popped in this newly released music from Poledouris' "score" to the live-action stage show of The Adventures of Conan that appeared at the Universal Studios Hollywood theme park in 1983. Everything I expected out of this music was generally met with the exception of one major letdown.

Before I get to the main problem I had with this entry into the musical Conan history, I'll give a rundown of what this is exactly. The CD consists of two tracks, the first being the the audio (dialogue and a few sound effects here and there) of the original show, with the second track being the isolated score. Interestingly, the isolated score portion runs more than twice as long as the first track. Perhaps Poledouris scored a lengthy selection to allow those associated with the show to cut the score around the action and pick just what they needed. The dialogue track is really cheesy with plenty of over-the-top acting, and I was a little annoyed at not being completely able to follow what was going on. Also, the isolated score track is nicely mastered, but the dialogue track does contain a noticeable analog hiss to it. That's not a big problem really, since at least the isolated music portion sounds great. And that's what we're really interested in, right?

The score itself bears all that would be expected of big orchestral fantasy music from Basil Poledouris. It has everything from nice pastoral cues to rousing action sequences backed with a full chorus. The chorus is used really well, but I prefer the work in the original as opposed to this. The music pretty much runs the gauntlet of what was found in the original Conan, and the running time of 16 minutes is enough to do justice to the different sections.

I have not yet reviewed Poledouris' sequel score, Conan the Destroyer, but from what I've heard, he doesn't really includes any of the themes from the original, but instead merely hints at them. Well, that leads in to the biggest problem I have with the music. It is really good, but I really wish he would utilize his some of his themes from the original score. One of the themes in here is reminiscent of a theme from the original, but that only served to annoy me because I wanted the music to swell into the theme that I've come to know and love. I don't know why Poledouris just wouldn't up and use his own previous themes again. Oh well, that's enough of my grousing.

Despite my complaints, this is really good music, and if you're a big fan of the Conan series of scores, you should be thankful to Super Collector for putting out this album.
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 20:23

An actor from the show:





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Cromulus The Destroyer
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Thu 12 Jun - 21:01

Steroids are no good for you! Mr. Green
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Tue 31 Mar - 11:57

VIDEOS:

1-



2-



3-



4-

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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Mon 10 Oct - 4:43

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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Fri 14 Oct - 4:20

Would make a great extra on blu ray for Red Sonja 1985 or Conan 2 Director cut !!!!!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/universalstonecutter/tags/aswordandsorceryspectaular/
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Sun 12 Jan - 23:38

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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Wed 1 Jun - 16:57

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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Wed 1 Jun - 16:59

Photos and interview here http://www.drmaryreidgaudio.com/update/podcast-with-ric-drasin/
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PostSubject: Re: The Adventures of Conan: Sword and Sorcery Spectacular   Today at 5:56

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